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  • Sluggish, Unhappy Employees Aren't Good For Any Business' Bottom-line

    Jul 16, 2015 8:49:19 AM| By Stephen Barlow-Lawson

    When choosing the computer workstation furniture for their offices, not enough employers consider how their employees' posture will affect the business' bottom-line. Instead, too many business owners only think about how the furniture they buy will influence their bottom-line and, thus, look for furniture with the lowest price tags possible.

     

    But, if more employers took the time to consider how sitting for extended periods of time kills employees' work productivity and negatively affects moods, they would realize that investing in standing desks and ergonomic chairs is a totally worthwhile business decision.

     

    Sitting Drains Energy & Affects Productivity

    A study conducted in support of the Take-a-Stand Project showed that workers feel more energetic and productive when they're not sitting at a desk all day. Poor posture can make you feel uncomfortable and sluggish, which means you will spend more time fidgeting in your chair or trying to focus than you will actually working on the task at hand. If you want to avoid that afternoon slump where everyone's productivity tanks, provide your staff with standing desks that allow them to easily change their position throughout the day.

     

    Less Sitting Promotes a Happier Workplace

    In a study out of the University of Tasmania, on the psychological impacts of sitting all day, researchers found that workplaces where employees didn't sit for longer than three hours each day had lower rates of anxiety and depression. It goes without saying that both of these bi-products of prolonged sitting can and do affect work productivity and can lead to greater numbers of sick days, too. If this is the case and all that's needed to create a happier, healthier workplace is a change in computer workstation furniture, it seems like switching to standing desks should be a fairly obvious business decision.

     

    If you're ready to improve productivity levels and the overall mood at your workplace, take a minute to browse the selection of Biomorph standing desks. Please don't hesitate to contact us if you have questions or would like to learn more about a particular product.

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  • Sitting for Long Periods of Time Can Negatively Affect the Body from Head to Toe. Here's How

    Jul 7, 2015 8:47:00 AM| By Stephen Barlow-Lawson

    Few people who work at desks all day haven't heard that their seated posture is killing them. May seem like an exaggeration, but the truth is that without a standing desk and ergonomic chairs that promote healthy work postures, you are, in fact, negatively affecting your overall health. And, while most people are aware of the fact that sitting isn't good for them, few know how poor posture actually influences their health.

     

    The Brain:

    When you sit in an unhealthy posture for long periods of time, blood clots can form and, if they travel to the brain, they can cause a stroke.


    The Neck:

    Believe it or not, fluid that builds in the legs while you're sitting for long periods of time can travel up to the neck at night, when you're lying down, and exacerbate an existing sleep apnea problem.


    The Heart:

    Sitting for long periods of time and not getting enough exercise are often contributing factors for heart disease.


    The Lungs:

    For people who have heart attacks, fluid collects in the lungs first. This is similar to how fluid build in the legs, after sitting for long periods of time, and then travels to the neck.


    The Arms:

    An active lifestyle that doesn't include sitting for extended periods of time can help reduce the risks of hypertension and high blood pressure. Poor posture also contributes to a variety of repetitive-stress injuries, such as carpal tunnel syndrome.


    The Stomach:

    Because the enzymes that are required to burn fat lie in blood vessels that can be shut off because of prolonged sitting, there's a higher risk of obesity. Colon cancer is another serious repercussion of a sedentary lifestyle.


    The Legs:

    When you sit for long periods of time, fluid builds in the legs which, as I've noted above, can travel to other parts of the body and cause serious problems. 

     

    As you can see, spending a great deal of time sitting does, in fact, have a negative effect on the whole body. Incorporating more movement in your day, via a standing desk, and maintaining the best possible posture when you are seated, via ergonomic chairs, is the absolute best way to prevent these potentially serious health issues.

     

    Ready to change the way you work? Browse our selection of ergonomic chairs and adjustable desks now.

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  • Poor Posture is Wreaking Havoc on Your Body

    Jun 23, 2015 2:00:00 PM| By Stephen Barlow-Lawson

    You may already be feeling the general aches and pains of working at a computer all day, but it's important to take steps to avoid the potentially serious physical injuries that are so commonly related to poor posture and desk use. Unless you're using an adjustable desk and have sourced the best ergonomic chair for your physical and occupational needs, there's a good chance you're lacking in the good posture department.

    You may start out sitting up straight, with feet firmly planted on the floor, arms bent at the elbows and resting comfortably at your sides, but as you get caught up in what you're working on, it's easy to forget about posture and, before you know it, you're slouched over your computer keyboard and your muscles, joints and productivity pay the price.

    These are some of the most common posture related injuries sustained by computer users, like yourself:

    Hand & Arm Repetitive Stress Injuries

    Using the same muscles and tendons in your hands, arms and elbows, day in day out, can certainly take its toll. Add poor posture to repeatedly using those same parts of the body and you can wind up with stiffness, aching and even numbness. Here are some ways to alleviate the stress put on your hands and arms while working at a computer:

    • don't pound on the keyboard but type as lightly as you can
    • try to avoid long stretches of typing to give your hands and arms a break
    • keep your computer mouse at the same height as your keyboard (and make sure your keyboard is in the best possible position for good posture)
    • move the mouse using your whole arm, not just your wrist

    Shoulder, Back & Neck Pain/Injury

    Combine sitting for long periods of time with a less-than-ideal workstation and bad posture and you're setting yourself up for neck, back and shoulder strain. With poor posture comes poor circulation, which can cause muscles, joints and tendons to become stiff and sore.

    Above all else, working at an adjustable desk with the best ergonomic chair for the task at hand is the way to minimize stress on these parts of the body. Add regular movement and stretching to a workstation that's designed to promote good posture and you will be well on your way to a healthy, more productive way of working.

    Take a major step as far as your health is concerned and improve your workstation once and for all. Browse the selection of high quality office furniture from Biomorph now and find the  adjustable desk and ergonomic chair that are missing from your office. 

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  • Adopt Healthy Habits for Working at a Desk

    Jun 4, 2015 2:00:00 PM| By Stephen Barlow-Lawson

    For many of us, working at a computer for several hours each day is a job requirement that's not about to change any time soon. The problem, however, with sitting for long periods of time at work and then adding to our daily sit count when we commute and watch TV in the evenings is that it takes a toll on our health.

    Perhaps you've already experienced some of the negative effects of sitting, such as aches and pains in various parts of your body. Or, maybe statements made by medical researchers that include sitting is just as bad for your health as smoking are enough to have you looking for some ways to make your work habits a little healthier.

    Today's post includes some healthy work habits that can be easily incorporated into your daily routine and that will not only help to minimize the effects of long-term sitting but also improve productivity.

    Re-evaluate Your Workstation

    Many people would think it's a stretch to say that their computer furniture is killing them, but research shows sitting at a desk puts people at a higher risk for a whole host of health problems, while poor posture takes its toll on your body and reduces work productivity. By simply switching to a sit stand workstation, where your desk can be easily adjusted to allow you to stand while you work for at least some of the day, you can dramatically reduce your risk and improve productivity. Standing keeps your muscles active and your mind alert while also helping with circulation.

    Break from Sitting, Wherever & Whenever Possible

    Even if you own a sit stand workstation and are actively incorporating more standing time into your day, it's important for you to take regular breaks and to make a point of moving your body. Instead of emailing your co-worker whose office is down the hall, get up and walk to ask them a question. Take a few minutes to stretch out your legs, arms, neck and shoulders. Eat lunch in a place other than your desk, and if possible, get outside whenever you can.

    Watch What You Eat & Drink

    Throughout the work day, drink plenty of water and avoid the sugary beverages that are full of empty calories and will only send you into an afternoon slump. Keep healthy snacks on hand, as it's easy to overeat while you're focused on something other than what you're putting in your mouth.

    Add Exercise to Your Day

    While adopting movement-friendly computer furniture and moving more throughout the day will help reduce your risk of injury and other health issues, getting regular exercise is also a great way to improve your productivity. Start your day with a brisk walk or run, attend a fitness class or head to the gym.   

    It's time to do something positive for your health and your work productivity! Upgrade your computer furniture to a sit stand workstation that's capable of keeping your body active and your mind sharp. Browse the selection of premium computer furniture from Biomorph now.

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  • Shopping for an Ergonomic Office Chair? Select the Best Possible Chair for Your Needs

    May 21, 2015 2:00:00 PM| By Stephen Barlow-Lawson

    In addition to an adjustable desk, choosing to buy an ergonomic office chair is one of the best decisions you can make for your health and productivity, if you're one of the many people around the world who work at a desk for several hours each day. Knowing how to choose between the ergonomic desk chairs that are available, however, may be a little less obvious. Today's post will provide some helpful pointers that are meant to simplify your search.

    Why It's Important to Find the Right Ergonomic Office Chair

    When you sit for extended periods of time in the wrong chair, it doesn't take long for small aches and stiffness to evolve into more serious and even permanent injuries. People who sit in poorly designed chairs instead of quality ergonomic desk chairs are more susceptible to circulation problems, carpal tunnel syndrome, tendonitis, and the list goes on. Taking the time to find the best ergonomic chair for your specific work needs will pay off in more ways than one both now and in the future.

    What to Look for in a Desk Chair

    Above all else, you want a chair that allows you to adjust its various parts or components. The more you're able to customize your chair to suit your size and shape, the more comfortable and productive the workspace.

    The Height of the Seat: You need to be able to plant your feet firmly on the floor, with your legs bent at a 90̊ angle at the knees.

    The Depth of the Seat: When a chair is too deep, it can restrict circulation in your legs. Ideally, you want to be able to fit your fist between the back of your calf and the front edge of the seat. Some ergonomic desk chairs will allow you to adjust the seat depth by moving the backrest forward or backward.

    Back Support: Back support, and specifically lumbar support, is crucial in a quality desk chair. You should look for a chair with a lumbar support that can be made to fit snuggly into the curve of your back, reducing the opportunity for you to slump forward in your seat.

    Adjustable Recline: Look for a chair that will allow you to adjust the recline on the backrest so that you can shift your weight in the seat for optimal comfort.

    Armrests that Move: It's important that you be able to move the armrests up or down so that no matter the height of your work surface, your arms can be kept at a 90̊ angle and the palms of your hands can rest on the work surface.

    Of course, an ergonomic chair that's paired with a poorly designed desk or table will limit the effectiveness of your workstation. For the best possible work set-up, a carefully selected ergonomic chair paired with an adjustable desk is the way to go.

    Are you ready to discover the benefits of working in the most healthful and comfortable way possible?  Browse the selection of premium ergonomic office furniture in our product line.   

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  • Work Productivity & Health Don't Just Improve When You Stand Rather than Sit - Movement Matters

    May 12, 2015 2:00:00 PM| By Stephen Barlow-Lawson

    There's a great deal of well-supported research demonstrating how health and work productivity dramatically improve when people spend less time sitting in chairs. Standing desks, like those in our line of premium, ergonomic office furniture, allow users to adjust their workstations, thereby reducing the number of hours they spend seated each day. But the key to better health and improved efficiency isn't just about standing while you work - it's about moving.

    You're probably thinking that it would be nearly impossible for you to incorporate more movement into your day if you work at a computer and are expected to get anything done. In actuality, however, there are several clever ways you can not only limit the amount of time you spend sitting by converting your adjustable office desk to the standing position, but also increase the amount of moving you do, while you work.

    Schedule Time with Your Adjustable Office Desk

    Even those with an adjustable office desk can lose track of time and forget to adjust their desk and change their position. By simply scheduling time to stand, you can incorporate more movement into your day. Some people set alarms on their smart phones or use other helpful devices like the Wellness Switch, which reminds you when to stand and tracks the number of minutes you spend standing. This switch will even tell you how many calories you burned at the end of each day.

    Move When You Stand to Work

    Instead of just standing still while using your adjustable office desk (which can be just as uncomfortable as sitting for long periods of time), take the opportunity to stretch and move your legs. Knee bends, shifting your weight back and forth,  swaying and even rolling your shoulders are all good ways to incorporate a little more movement while you work.

    Pair Standing Desks with 'Active' Seats

    Believe it or not, there are actually chairs and stools available that allow you to easily maintain movement and optimal posture while you sit at your desk. The Saddle Stool from Humanscale, for instance, keeps muscles engaged and active while you're seated. Moving from side to side at your workstation also helps to maintain circulation in your legs and keeps you alert.

    If you're ready to reduce the health risks associated with the way you work and are looking to step up your productivity, start adding more movement to your work day. To begin, equip your workspace with an adjustable office desk that gets you up out of your seat and working from a more comfortable and healthful position. For information on what you'll need for a more active way to work, please call us: (888) 302-DESK.

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  • Shopping for New Office Workstation Furniture? Consider This

    Apr 30, 2015 2:00:00 PM| By Stephen Barlow-Lawson

    It's in the best interest of every employer to equip their staff with comfortable office workstation furniture. Poorly designed and constructed desks and chairs create uncomfortable working environments and often lead to higher rates of repetitive stress injury and lower work productivity. If your staff can't work comfortably, their health and your bottom line suffer!

    So, if you're looking to revitalize your office's working environment with new furniture, there are some things you should keep in mind. Doing so will ensure that the ergonomic desk chairs and workstations you purchase will provide you with the best possible return on your investment.

     How Will the Furniture be Used? 

    For starters, you need to choose office workstation furniture and/or ergonomic desk chairs that are the right fit for the tasks being performed. Will the people using the workstations and chairs be working on computers and doing a great deal of typing? Will they be doing other work at their desks, as well, such as hand writing notes? Or, will the furniture be part of a specialized workstation, such as in the health care field?

     The Size & Shape of Your Work Environment

     People often start shopping for ergonomic desk chairs and desks or tables without giving any thought to how the furniture will fit in their work space. Before selecting furniture, be sure to measure the size of  your space and to consider the layout of the new and existing furniture. You will also want to take into account the type of equipment that's used at each workstation and the type and location of light sources.

    What Office Workstation Furniture Will You Need?

    Some considerations:

    • Ergonomic desk chairs that allow users to adjust armrests and chair height for optimal comfort
    • Adjustable desks and sit-stand desks, in particular
    • Monitor arms that allow users to adjust the height and angle of the screens, unless you purchase desks with dual surfaces
    • Footrests
    • Adjustable lighting

    Cost Counts

    As with most things in life, the amount of money you spend on the furniture for your workplace will undoubtedly determine your satisfaction. Inexpensive furniture, for instance, is often poorly designed and constructed from inferior materials, which leads to a less comfortable fit, fewer options for adjustability and a shorter lifespan. Be sure to weigh the pros and cons of your investment; will paying slightly more in the short-term lead to greater satisfaction in the long-run?

    For information on the range of premium adjustable office furniture available from Biomorph, please get in touch with us: (888) 302-DESK.

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  • Coordinate Your Office Workstation Furniture for Optimal Health & Productivity

    Apr 23, 2015 2:00:00 PM| By Stephen Barlow-Lawson

    While many people are aware of the dangers of sitting for long periods of time or that poor work posture can lead to injuries, there are still a large number who are failing to use their office workstation furniture correctly or whose furniture is poorly coordinated. It's not enough to simply purchase ergonomic desk chairs or adjustable desks for your staff and to expect a dramatic improvement in work productivity and a decrease in the number of repetitive stress injuries. For optimal health and productivity, all of the various components of a workstation must be used as they were intended, synchronized, and working together to provide the best possible fit.

    Coordinate Your Workstation

     To begin, quality ergonomic desk chairs and workstations are a must if you wish to reduce the risk of negative health effects and poor productivity. In particular, studies have shown that reducing the amount of time you spend sitting each day is of particular importance and that an adjustable, sit-stand desk can dramatically improve comfort and efficiency on all fronts.

    Now the key is to use your office workstation furniture as it was intended:

    A Few Points About Posture:

    • Your upper arms should be parallel to your spine, elbows at a 90̊ angle and hands should be able to rest comfortably on the top of your workstation. Adjust the chair's armrests to reduce strain on your neck and shoulders.
    • Minimize reaching by sitting as close to your desk as possible
    • Legs should be bent at a 90̊ angle, as well
    • Shift your body to the back of the chair, as sitting on the chair's edge will lead to slouching

    The Height and Depth of Ergonomic Desk Chairs:

    • To minimize swelling in the legs, ankles and feet, adjust your chair so that your feet can be firmly planted on the ground. If this isn't possible, use a stool to bring feet and legs into the proper position - avoid leaving legs and feet to hang.
    • For good circulation, you should be able to fit your fist between the back of your calf and the front of the seat's edge. If you can't, it's likely that your desk chair is too deep.

    Computer Monitor Height:

    • When looking straight ahead, your eyes should focus on the center of your computer screen. A dual-surfaced desk that allows you to adjust the height of your monitor(s) is ideal. If your desk isn't equipped with this feature, however, consider using a monitor arm that allows you to quickly and easily adjust the height of your screen.

    This is really just the beginning in terms of how your office workstation furniture can be put to work to ensure the best possible fit for people of all shapes and sizes. Of course, the quality and design of your office furniture will play a large role in determining its effectiveness, but knowing how to select and use your furniture for optimal health and productivity is also of the utmost importance.

    For help designing the workstation that's best for you or your staff, please call us: (888) 302-DESK.

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  • New York Magazine Article on Good Posture

    Jan 20, 2015 1:19:51 PM| By Stephen Barlow-Lawson

    The Slouchproof Desk

    Before you hunch over one more email, heed this advice from an acupuncturist, a Feldenkrais practitioner, and six other spine czars.


    ShareThis
    Illustration by Jason Lee  

     

    1. “The computer screen should be about an arm’s length away and centered in front of you to avoid neck strain. This is also a good rule of thumb when you’re on your phone for avoiding so-called text neck.” 
    Alan HedgeCornell professor and director of the human factors and ergonomics teaching and research programs

     

    2. “You want to sit at your desk at the center of what we call the ‘circle of power.’ Place everything you need within easy access and comfortable reach. There’s no specific place you need to keep your phone or stapler—having something on the right or left is irrelevant—as long as it’s within that circle.” 
    —Stephen Barlow-Lawson, president of ergonomic-furniture-maker Biomorph

     

    3. “To automatically align yourself, imagine a book on your head. Your chest opens and your shoulders go back. You’ll be able to get more air.” 
    —Rachel Potasznik, certified Feldenkrais practitioner and founder of BetterBodyLab

     

    4. “Pulling in your neck to create a double chin is a good neck stretch. Do a few sets of ten. Women don’t like this one, but I tell them to do it when no one’s looking.” 
    —Kiambu Dickerson, massage therapist and head of New York Orthopedic Massage

     

     

    5. “When tension builds up in the neck, shoulders, and upper back, it blocks the flow of Chi, which is energy that encourages blood flow and organ function. I recommend that people get up every hour from their desk and walk around and do some qigong stretches—shoulder shrugs, shaking the head ‘yes’ and ‘no,’ looking gently from shoulder to shoulder. They work wonders if practiced throughout the day.” 
    Bethel SabinBrooklyn-based acupuncturist

     

    6. “The most common mistake people make in sittingis they rock back on their pelvis, which causes slumping of the low back. The lumbar spine is in flux. I suggest sitting at the end of the chair or putting a pillow behind their back to prevent this.” 
    —Rey Allen, certified Rolfer and owner of Rolfing New York

     

    7. “A simple trick to get back to a neutral body is to take a thick towel, make it as dense as possible, and place it underneath you in the chair. Push the towel a little forward, so your butt hangs off the back edge. Do this for five minutes, then take the towel away, and you’ll be surprised by how much better you feel.” 
    —Kiambu Dickerson

     

    8. “Adjust your chair so you have a right angle at your knees and your feet are flat on the floor.”  
    —Stephen Barlow-Lawson

     

    9. “Going the standing-desk route may decrease the pressure on the discs, but be careful about your shoes: Heels as well as flats can lead to pain. Sneakers are optimal—if Nikes aren’t an option at work, slip into them only while you’re at your desk.” 
    Dr. Kenneth Chapmanassistant clinical professor, NYU Langone Medical Center

     

    10. “Attach a height-adjustable keyboard to your work surface that allows you to tilt the keyboard down and away from you slightly for better wrist posture.” 
    —Alan Hedge

     

    “Yes, sitting on a balance ball is a good way to train oneself to practice good posture,but remember it’s not a magic ball. It doesn’t make it easier to have better posture but serves as a reminder that one needs to actually work harder—that is, to actively engage the core muscles—to achieve a good sitting position.” 
    —Ross Markowitz, exercise specialist at La Palestra Center for Preventative Medicine, a hybrid gym and physical-therapy practice

     

    “I tell my clients to trade chairs with someone else in the office once a week. You have to constantly change up the situation.” 
    —Rey Allen

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  • Yoga Can Help to Undo the Damage Caused by Your Desk Job

    Oct 3, 2013 2:13:47 AM| By Stephen Barlow-Lawson

    When you sit at a desk all day at work, you're risking a great deal more than just a stiff neck or a sore rear end. Reports that emerged in 2012 show that sitting all day can cause the development of chronic illnesses like heart disease, diabetes, and even morbid obesity. In order to combat these issues, there are a number of things that you can do, such as working at an ergonomic standing desk and practicing yoga. The movements and stretches that are performed during yoga not only promote greater flexibility, but they can also ease tension and help you to improve the flow of oxygen to the body.

    Yoga Works All Parts of the Body

    While an ergonomic standing desk will help you maintain a greater sense of movement and flexibility during your work day, practicing yoga will help you work out the kinks in your back, neck, and legs that you did pick up during those eight hours at the office. Yoga is a great solution to the problems that are often caused by prolonged sitting, and by doing a number of different positions each night after work, you can work different parts of the body that  may be affected. The arms, legs, hands, hips, and even your wrists and fingers are all involved in a variety of yoga moves, and many of them are simple to perform. You do not have to be an expert to try these moves, but you should be careful and start off slowly.

    Yoga Moves That Combat Prolonged Sitting

    While there are a number of yoga moves that you can do, there are some that are particularly good for your body if you must sit for long periods or if you don't have access to an ergonomic standing desk. Some moves, such as the mountain pose, the fish pose, and the bound angle pose can stretch the back muscles, open up airways that may become cramped from leaning forward over a desk all day, and stretch and open the hips to relieve back and sciatica pain. When you first attempt these moves, don't rush; yoga is all about relaxation and a focus on what your body is doing, not how fast you can achieve it. Some moves, such as slow neck stretches, can even be performed during the day when you take a break in your office.

    Enhancing Your Yoga with Furniture from Biomorph

    Call us today at 888-302-DESK to learn more about how an ergonomic standing desk can be part of a healthy office regimen that includes ergonomic awareness and yoga. We have a large variety of desks, chairs, and other office equipment that will contribute to a healthier work environment so that you feel energized and alert throughout your work day. Our furniture, when combined with healthy lifestyle choices such as yoga, will help you to maintain a healthy mind and body, no matter where you work or what demands you face on a daily basis.

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